Behind The Scenes

While marine spill response is generally associated with vessels on the water deploying boom and recovering oil product, there is also a significant amount of work that goes on behind the scenes to support that on-water activity. We don’t always talk about it, but in a successful marine spill response, this work is just as important as vessels and boom on the water. This page includes some of the behind the scene work that is underway in support of the Bligh Island Shipwreck response. More information will be added throughout the response.

Behind the Scenes: Environmental Unit

The Environmental Unit (EU) plays a critical role in the Incident Command Post, providing Unified Command with science based recommendations to minimize the impacts of oil upwelling from the MV Schiedyk on the environment. The unit is comprised of experts and knowledge holders from the Mowachaht/Muchalaht First Nation, Hesquiaht First Nation, Nuu-chah-nulth Tribal Council, Environment [...]

April 15th, 2021|Categories: Behind The Scenes, Latest Updates|

Behind the Scenes: Technical Assessment

A technical assessment is the next major step in addressing the oil leaking from the MV Schiedyk. A contract for the assessment has been awarded, and the Mowachaht/Muchalaht First Nation and the Environmental Unit have identified a window of opportunity in April and May as the best time for the assessment to proceed, with reduced [...]

March 29th, 2021|Categories: Behind The Scenes, Latest Updates|

Site-Specific Weather Forecasting

  Behind the Scenes: Site-Specific Weather Forecasting  Keeping responders safe is of the utmost importance. As some response operations are weather-dependant, having reliable weather forecasts helps the operations team figure out what they can accomplish safely. As part of the Bligh Island Shipwreck response, Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) is providing the Unified Command [...]

March 18th, 2021|Categories: Behind The Scenes, Latest Updates|

Behind the Scenes: Herring are coming

  Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) manages the Pacific herring fishery, but did you know that herring management staff are also working with the Mowachaht/Muchalaht First Nation and the Canadian Coast Guard at the Bligh Island shipwreck response? As is common at this time of year, Pacific herring are expected to arrive in Nootka Sound [...]

March 11th, 2021|Categories: Behind The Scenes, Latest Updates|

Behind the Scenes: Safety on the water

Responders working on the Bligh Island Shipwreck face a medium to high risk due to the nature of the work during a response, weather conditions in Zuciarte Channel, sea conditions and temperature, and sea state. To address this risk, the CCGS Moorhen, Coast Guard’s Safety Vessel, is on scene to monitor the conditions, and work [...]

March 5th, 2021|Categories: Behind The Scenes, Latest Updates|

Behind the Scenes – Radio Communications

The remoteness and mountainous geography of Nootka Sound on the West Coast of Vancouver Island is  beautiful but it is a challenge when it comes to communicating on the water. For the Bligh Island response efforts, where there is no direct line of sight from the staging area to the spill site because of the [...]

February 25th, 2021|Categories: Behind The Scenes, Latest Updates|

Mowachaht/Muchalaht Traditional Knowledge

The Bligh Island shipwreck is located in the traditional territory of the Mowachaht/Muchalaht First Nation. From time immemorial and today, members of the Nation walk the beaches, travel and fish on the waters, and know the places, animals and birds, winds and landscapes better than anyone else. Since the M/V Schiedyk started leaking oil at [...]

February 18th, 2021|Categories: Behind The Scenes, Latest Updates|

Behind the Scenes: Marine Mammal Monitoring

The DFO Marine Mammal Response program (MMRP) has been on-site in Nootka Sound since early December 2020. A member of the Mowachaht/Muchalaht First Nation has joined the surveys and is a key part of our team. The MMRP is conducting marine mammal surveys to evaluate the risk to marine mammals (sea otters in particular) to [...]

February 4th, 2021|Categories: Behind The Scenes, Latest Updates|

Behind The Scenes: Local Weather Stations

The Bligh Island Shipwreck response has been aided by the installation of weather stations by Fisheries and Oceans Canada scientists. In late December, Institute of Ocean Sciences staff spent several days equipping three aquaculture facilities in Nootka Sound with weather stations. Winds in mountainous nearshore regions are often highly variable, and these stations provide critical [...]

January 28th, 2021|Categories: Behind The Scenes, Latest Updates|

Behind The Scenes: SCAT

SCAT is short for Shoreline Cleanup & Assessment Technique. SCAT helps responders assess and document shorelines contaminated by an oil spill. The SCAT program will generate information on the oiling conditions and will help the management team to decide on the appropriate response treatment techniques and treatment completion. SCAT teams are typically made up of [...]

January 21st, 2021|Categories: Behind The Scenes, Latest Updates|